Migrant Women Job Readiness Workshop

A job readiness workshop series for migrant women has been designed to improve the employability skills of migrant women across Western Australia affected by COVID-19 and to boost their employability.

The workshop will run over five days, during school hours from 9.00am to 2.30pm.

Workshop topics

Eligibility criteria

To attend the series, you must:

1. Be a migrant woman

2. Have vocational English language to perform effectively in the workplace of your field (level 3 certificate or higher)

3. Commit to attend all five workshops.

This workshop is designed for women who have limited or no work experience in either their home country or Australia. It is also suitable for women who are transitioning to a new job/career or reconnecting to their career after a break (less than 5 years).


The last date to register for this workshop is Thursday 14 July 2022.

Migrant Women Job Readiness Workshop

A job readiness workshop series for migrant women has been designed to improve the employability skills of migrant women across Western Australia affected by COVID-19 and to boost their employability.

The workshop will run over five days, during school hours from 9.00am to 2.30pm.

Workshop topics

Eligibility criteria

To attend the series, you must:

1. Be a migrant woman

2. Have vocational English language to perform effectively in the workplace of your field (level 3 certificate or higher)

3. Commit to attend all five workshops.

This workshop is designed for women who have limited or no work experience in either their home country or Australia. It is also suitable for women who are transitioning to a new job/career or reconnecting to their career after a break (less than 5 years).


The last date to register for this workshop is Thursday 23 June 2022.

The Story of a Refugee

Amena Bahrami

My name is Amena Bahrami and I am a 31 year old Afghan.

I was born in Iran and lived there until I was 13 years old. My family and I moved back to Afghanistan where I lived there from the age of 13 until 30. I finished my secondary school and completed my Economic Degree with a major in accounts and management. I was lucky to get a job straight after I finished my studies at Medica, at an organisation that worked to support and empower women by dealing with issues around psychosocial behaviour, domestic violence, and human rights.

My favourite part of the job was working in finance and administration. To have this role, a person needed to be honest and truthful and I was the right person for the job because I do not tolerate lies and manipulation, especially fraud. That is why I had to leave this job because I found out that there was fraud occurring in the organisation, especially the high levels of the workplace. I had to leave because I didn’t have enough power to change what was happening there. I ended up getting another job in banking, where I started as a customer services representative, then a business development officer and finally was promoted to customer service officer.

On 25 July 2021, I got a job with an organisation called Skateistan. My job was to report all finance issues to the main office. They didn’t have a finance person before, so I found myself doing finance management and administration tasks. I worked well with my manager, who is also now living in Australia, in Melbourne.

We were meant to move into a bigger office because the organisation was getting bigger but unfortunately on the 16 August 2021, Afghanistan fell. The Taliban had hit.

I can’t forget that day, as I speak now, I can still remember everything.

My heart is broken, my mind is confused. I am sorry. 

On that day we were at work. Straight away, our main office told us to escape. We needed to pack up all the laptops, documents and money in the safe. My manager told us that the Taliban would try to take over all the Non-Government Organisations, so we had to leave. That same day, my manager and three other female colleagues got picked up by my manager’s husband and a male driver to start our escape journey.

We started to make our way to Kabul, the capital city of Afghanistan, but were stopped midway by the Taliban. They stopped us and that was a very scary moment in my life, I feared for my life because the Taliban have very bad ideologies, especially towards woman. Before the fall of the republic government, women were able to access all facilities and services. That day of the takeover, I call it the darkest day of my life because I, and all the women of Afghanistan, knew that our dreams and ambitions were shattered. When the Taliban stopped the car, we didn’t know what would happen to us. As they spoke to my manager’s husband and the driver, we four ladies escaped at the back of the car.

We came back later to find that they had given a very serious warning to the driver, by using a knife to mark the driver’s arm. That night we had to rest at a small village but later continued our journey and finally managed to arrive safely to Kabul. Not once could I contact my family because I did not have any credit on my phone.  I finally called my family when we got to the airport because I wanted to tell them what had happened. I used this time to tell them to come to the capital so we could flee Afghanistan together. It took three days for our visas to be processed and approved. When I spoke to my family again, they had made it into Kabul but because the bomb dropped near the border, they were not able to access the airport because hundreds of people were all trying to escape. My manager, my colleagues and I had no choice but to leave. We left with nothing just the clothes on our bodies. We couldn’t say goodbye, we just left.

When I arrived in Australia, I was warmly welcomed, and this made me happy because I knew I was now in a place where I could see a bright future for myself. Even though here everything is different from my country, I believe I can adapt to all the conditions and be resilient. I am very interested in improving my life and being active in the community. I completed my Certificate 3 in English and now want to improve my English language and communication skills. That is why with some valuable help, I applied to volunteer at the City of Stirling and I was luckily accepted. Now I am a volunteering at City of Stirling’s Kaleidoscope Initiative, and I am very happy to be here. I am looking for a paid job so that I can pay for my driving lessons and accommodation. I also hope if I can get a job, it will help me start my Certificate 4 in English. I have experience in banking back in Afghanistan, but I understand that I need to build my experience here in Australia too. I am hopeful that an opportunity will come for this too.

This is my story.

If you would like to contact Amena regarding a potential employment opportunity please reach out to us at kaleidoscope@stirling.wa.gov.au or call (08) 9205 8368.

Job readiness workshop helps Susan return to her passion

The Kaleidoscope Migrant Women’s Job Readiness Workshop is a free workshop series designed to boost the employability skills of migrant women across WA.

Susan Nkechi Anopueme is a successful graduate of the program and has recently secured a role in education – the field she loves.

In 2009, Susan left her home country of Nigeria and a career as a school teacher to start a new life in Western Australia.

When she began searching for a job she encountered a lot of inaccurate information about working in Australia.

She was led to believe that as a migrant it would be very difficult to find a job, especially as she had completed her training overseas.

“I was told that my degree would not matter. I was so concerned that in 2011 I retrained in community development, a field that I found interesting but challenging and very different from school teaching,” she said.

“I even thought I may have to change my name, as I was told it would deter employers.”

Frustrated and confused, Susan began searching for a more reliable source of career information and training, which she found in Kaleidoscope’s Migrant Women’s Job Readiness Workshop.

“The Job Readiness Workshop opened my eyes to the truth and gave me a lot of practical information, like how to format and write a resume.”

Before completing the workshop, numerous unsuccessful job applications and interviews had left Susan doubting her abilities.

“The program gave me confidence in my knowledge and skills. It helped me prepare for job interviews and not give up before I even gave myself a chance.”

Today living in Aveley, Susan is working as a Technical Assistant in Home Economics at a local secondary school – the field she originally trained in and describes as her passion. “I thought I would have to leave the work I love behind, but thanks to the program I’ve found a job that I really enjoy.” Far beyond her days of failed interviews, Susan is now thinking how she can move forward and progress her career aspirations.

“I’m considering my options, perhaps completing a masters in education or even progressing my community development knowledge.”

When asked if she would recommend the Job Readiness Workshop to other migrant women, Susan replied “100 per cent. I’d take the workshop again to refresh my skills if I could!”

“There are a lot of challenges that come with being a migrant skilled worker, but do not give up because we have so much to offer.”

To register for a Migrant Women’s Job Readiness workshop please select from the following:

Bentley – 9 to 13 May

Midland – 27 June to 1 July

Kaleidoscope Migrant Women’s Job Readiness workshops are funded by Lotterywest, delivered by the Kaleidoscope Initiative and hosted in the City of Canning, City of Stirling and the City of Swan

Migrant Women Job Readiness – online workshop

A job readiness workshop series for migrant women has been designed to improve the employability skills of migrant women across Western Australia affected by COVID-19 and to boost their employability.

The workshop will run online over five days, during school hours from 9.00am to 2.30pm.

Workshop topics

Eligibility criteria

To attend the series, you must:

1. Be a migrant woman

2. Have vocational English language to perform effectively in the workplace of your field (level 3 certificate or higher)

3. Commit to attend all five workshops.

4. You will need a computer, laptop or tablet and internet access for each day of this online workshop. If you don’t have access to a suitable device please advise upon registration and we can provide information on where and how to book a computer at a public library.

This workshop is designed for women who have limited or no work experience in either their home country or Australia. It is also suitable for women who are transitioning to a new job/career or reconnecting to their career after a break (less than 5 years).


Registrations will close  Thursday 10 March 2022.

Migrant Women Job Readiness – online workshop

A job readiness workshop series for migrant women has been designed to improve the employability skills of migrant women across Western Australia affected by COVID-19 and to boost their employability.

The workshop will run online over five days, during school hours from 9.00am to 2.30pm.

Workshop topics

Eligibility criteria

To attend the series, you must:

1. Be a migrant woman

2. Have vocational English language to perform effectively in the workplace of your field (level 3 certificate or higher)

3. Commit to attend all five workshops.

4. You will need a computer, laptop or tablet and internet access for each day of this online workshop. If you don’t have access to a suitable device please advise upon registration and we can provide information on where and how to book a computer at a public library.

This workshop is designed for women who have limited or no work experience in either their home country or Australia. It is also suitable for women who are transitioning to a new job /career or reconnecting to their career after a break (less than 5 years).

 


Registrations will close  Thursday 17 February 2022.

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